Dropouts in instrumental music activities

Dropouts in instrumental music activities

Frakes (1984) studied reasons for dropouts in instrumental music activities. The research found significant differences in the perceptions of musical ability of the dropout students compared to those students who continued with music activities.

 

Dropouts in instrumental music lessons

Dropouts in instrumental music activities

 

 

The findings found considerable differences in musical achievement and attitudes towards musical participation The differences found for dropout students consisted of feeling less musically able, receiving less family support and encouragement, feeling musically inadequate, and these students eventually turned to other leisure activities in place of music activities. The students who continued in instrumental music activities reported liking their teachers and had a positive perception of their musical skills. Frakes concluded that positive self-perception of music skills are important to continued music studies.

Interactions of personal, environmental, and learning processes contribute to self-perception. The research suggests relationships rather than single overarching reasons affect motivation and desire for continued musical activity. This adds further support for the idea that personal relationships in music lessons are important for continued participation, particularly for younger students.

Frakes, L. (1984). Differences in music achievement, academic achievement and attitude among participants, dropouts and non-participants in secondary school music. Ph.D, University of Iowa, Iowa.   (8507938)

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